Institutional Repository

Healing and spiritual care for female leaders in Japan

Item

Are you the author of this work? Please consider giving UWest consent to digitize and upload the electronic version your work and make it available to researchers around the world. Any existing embargo will continue to be observed.

Full Text Access

Embargoed until 2022-06-09. Consent agreement needed for Open Access.

Author

Moto-Sanchez, Milla Micka

Date

2020

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy in Religious Studies

Committee

Iwamura, Jane N.
Gauthier, Jitsujo T.
Arai, Paula K. R.

Abstract

This research examines the ways in which female spiritual care providers in contemporary Japan heal and empower themselves through service and connection. Its ultimate aim is to demonstrate how their healing practices and leadership can contribute to the development of the nascent spiritual care field as a distinct and promising discipline in Japan. It thus explores how their sui generis spirituality and methods of empowerment have helped to transcend the socio-religious divides and foster healing through interfaith and inter-disciplinary connectivity.

The study primarily relies on the ethnographic data obtained from studying the lives of more than 17 women of varied religious backgrounds, residing in different parts of Japan. The investigation employed personal interviews and participant observation in spiritual care and healing activities over a three-year period. The selection of the female leaders in the field for the in-depth study was based on the perceived maturity demonstrated in their spirituality and their active participation in the field of spiritual care. More importantly, these women became involved in the field as a result of experiencing a major natural disaster and/or personal tragedy. Other data were also obtained from other women and men during fieldwork, through informal interviews and observation, mainly for comparison purposes and general information.

There are now numerous articles and books that document the exponential growth of spiritual care programs in Japan in recent years. However, none underscores the significance of female presence in the field. The study thus seeks to socio-culturally further promote female leadership in the existing models of spiritual care in the increasingly globalized environment.

Degree Granter

University of the West

ISBN

9798645490416